All the running!

July’s mileage point indicated by the arrow. No wonder my legs are tired 😛

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Oh…it’s August!

Between several busy experiment weeks at work, increased running mileage, and family visits July was an exhausting, but satisfying month.

I spent the second-last weeks cramming in pre-6am specimen MRIs and a couple post-5pm CT scans and MRI re-scans for a time-sensitive (i.e. Refrigerated human body parts only last so long…) experiment, alongside some project plan writing, IRB paperwork, technique teaching, paper revisions, and an interdepartmental presentation that sent my heart briefly into the fat-burn zone on my FitBit but actually went quite well. The busyness of the last few weeks really hit when I ended up vacillating between nausea and extreme sleepiness at the End of Year Clinical-Fellow Hi/Goodbye party and had to head home before the dancing even started 😦

Enjoyed my presentation in spite pf my heart trying to escape


In spite of spending 5-15 extra hours at work the last few weeks I still managed some higher mileage running weeks (35, 40, and 43 miles) and a painful but beautiful trail half marathon. The running piled on a little additional weariness but greatly helped with the work stress, so was worthwhile even in the time-crunched recent few weeks.

I smiled for the camera and then went back to sleep-deprived, dehydrated slogging

Beautiful views followed by 3 hours of nausea…


The feeling of being stretched thin at work was also soothed by an amazing visit with my friend who just started a family medicine residency a few hours away and the promise of a few days off for a sister + MIL/FIL/BIL family visit. I am so lucky to have such wonderful people in my life 🙂

our fur-baby and BIL’s 5 month old puppy

Sister really savoring our time together bahaha

Family time on the train tracks

The desert near friend’s residency town – beautiful rocks and saw bats, frogs, bighorn sheep, and collared lizards!

#DayofScience

Apparently Thursday was #DayofScience. To celebrate I thought I’d share a couple typical if my typical ‘days of science’.

Experiment day:

July 13th was actually a specimen scan day so the schedule is *quite* fresh in my mind as I write this.

3:45 a.m.

Wake up (*yawwwwwn*), drive to work with radio blasting & careful eyes out for early morning deer trying to cross the highway.

4:30 a.m. – 7:00 a.m.

Arrive at medical center/research center. Clock in, change into scrubs, head into cadaver lab and prep specimens for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning (i.e. put in labeled biohazard bags and try not to let them leak all over)

Meet technologist at scanner, get protocols set up, eat bagels while magical physics makes images

7:30 a.m.

Pull up images, freak out because artifact screwed up the one image we didn’t check on scanner before ending the session

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Wrapping 😦      (The bright blob near the bottom is actually the top part of the shoulder, it shouldn’t run into the dark shapes of the scapula and humerus. MRI can use the phase of the molecule’s spin as a localizer by varying the magnetic field, and thus the resulting spin frequency, over the length or width of an image. Different frequencies makes the spins in different locations hit different phases of the spin at the same time. Here the MRI scanner got confused about the pixel location because the location-specific-phase for the upper and lower pixels in the image were the same due to inadequate phase range, so the computer thought the pixels should be in same location & overlaid them. Not helpful.)

7:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Talk to radiologist, technologist, research assistant, surgeon; get make-up scan slot squeezed in

Re-prep specimen, lug downstairs after wrapping *very* carefully so as to not freak out patients, get scanned, lug back upstairs

Get images off PACS (picture archiving and communication system), check images, sigh with relief because they look ok, let research assistant and surgeons know we’re ok to move forward.

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Better MR image (left) next to CT image of same shoulder (right). No weird wrapping this time!

9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Wait for surgeon who’s doing the research surgery to get through a morning case. Eat lunch while working on an end-of-year department summary.

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Discuss surgery with surgeon, find out he needs measurements from CT, run down to CT to talk to radiology tech, get 3D volumes, run back upstairs, find out 3D view angles aren’t quite right.

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Coordinate to get radiologist and surgeon to talk to each other, finally succeed and call surgery off in order to allow time to get measurements, firm up research plan.

Reduce frustration about delay by getting a hot cocoa.

Put shoulder specimens back in fridge, change out of scrubs. Mourn loss of clothing with real pockets.

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Come up with way to do the measurements in Mimics with more adjustable volume rendering, send examples to surgeon for approval.

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Meet with director of another department, discuss collaborative research projects.

3:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Work more on research presentation, emails, a few other small tasks.

Talk to PI about an industry project proposal.

Realize I forgot to eat my afternoon snack when my stomach cramps so hard I feel slightly ill.

5:30 p.m.

Head home!!! Shirk actual dinner making duties in favor of heating up pasta and sauce-from-a-jar with husband, who also worked a long day.

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4:30 a.m. versus 4:30 p.m. after wayyyy too many trips up and down the stairs

Normal, much more relaxed day:

7:00 a.m.

Arrive at work, clock in, check email

Grab large coffee (yay!) from hospital cafeteria

Chat with PI briefly in break room

8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

Work on PowerPoint presentation for PI

9:00 a.m.

Fill out some IRB paperwork

Bug PI for IRB paperwork signatures

Scan/mail IRB paperwork

Re-print and scan/mail at least one piece of IRB paperwork because I invariably miss something…

10:30 a.m.

Snack time! First snack of the day while starting some Matlab analysis

Debug code, run code, look at the lovely resulting data plots

12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch, either with coworkers or at desk with a book

1:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m.

Work on some image segmentation on Mimics, manually tracing regions of interest in MR or CT scan images on touchscreen

Grab a second (smaller) coffee and afternoon snack

More Mimics!

4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Meet with researchers from another department to go over a collaborative project

4:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

Send out more emails, wrap up work

Make to-do list for next day

5:00 p.m. Leave and go running 🙂

 

Art post 23-25

I’m falling a bit behind on my goal of 1-art-piece-or-major-addition-to-existing-piece/week, but am still getting a few doses of art-time in between all the running and temporarily more-intense-than-usual work schedule.

I’m currently being inspired (and made slightly jealous by!) the amazing artists featured on the MedLifeArt account on Instagram. I’m hoping that doing a little anatomy-art every week will serve as a dose of anatomy studying and will help me to improve my musculoskeletal system anatomy knowledge for work and improve my non-work human figure (especially human figure in motion) drawing skills.

Two bony structures that always give me a really tough time are the spine/vertebrae and the pelvis, so perhaps I should focus on those for the next few drawings…both have complicated structures and confusing spatial relationships so present a great challenge for capturing in two dimensions!

June running – snowy relays to sweaty, sun-burnt long runs

June turned out to be quite the wild running month. I started the month off in injury-recovery mode, praying things would hold together and get me through a frigid, snow-flurry-filled Sawtooth Relay without letting down my team or suffering a major hamstring set-back, and ended the month with a much happier hamstring and the confidence and strength to enjoy some long runs back on the trails in the summer heat.

Some highlights:

  1. Sawtooth Relay – in spite of a brief scare the day before (hamstring cramped briefly after a shakeout run with my teammate/friend) I was actually able to push the pace with zero pain or tightness, even with the couple hours of cramped van riding between my two relay legs! Our team had a blast as we pushed through swirling snow, sideways rain, and (luckily small!) hail stones to reach the much-appreciated sunshine at the finish line.

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    Went from getting pelted with half-frozen snow/rain to getting bombarded by hail and wind gusts. But at least it was warm enough for shorts on leg 2!

  2. New Oiselle singlet arrived. A small but fun highlight since I am a sucker for new running clothes. I can’t wait to fly in this sunset-glow design at my next race!  IMG_0270
  3. Return to trails! After a week of lowkey recovery after the relay I re-committed to my hamstring rehab and gradually tested my hamstring out on hillier, more demanding terrain. My final week in June included some long, hilly trail runs with no mid-run or post-run soreness, and enough confidence to enjoy the amazing trail views rather than constantly worrying about my hamstring.
  4. Managed a brief handstand balance with no body parts touching the wall! This one isn’t strictly running related, but did renew my motivation to continue consistent core and upper body strength work. The effect of strength and stability during easy running is less obvious, so it’s nice to have a more demanding test to see the results of all that flopping around on the yoga mat and getting dog hair all over my hands by doing pushups around the house.

Now it’s July and the trails are calling! I plan to spend as much time enjoying the singletrack as possible while using the lessons of March, April, and May to remind me to stay on top of pre/re-hab before little twinges take me back off the trails.

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Summer – the season for long runs and outdoor ice baths 🙂

Art post 21/running update

With MountainMan putting in some time at work today and my BolderBoulder race plans cancelled the Memorial Day holiday brought me a long day alone to get some work done around the house, do some reading, explore some new trails, and catch up a bit more on my drawing/art practice. 

I was blessed this morning with my first pain-free long, hilly run since injuring my hamstring. I set out to explore some new trails with the intention of walking if anything got tight or if the downhills were too long/steep, and the expectation of walking about a mile out of the 6-mile route. However, I actually only had to walk a couple times, and only chose to do so out of caution, rather than any difficulty with the hamstring. It was a sunny, beautiful day and I was so glad to get to fully savor the trails in all their hilly glory! This run was a great reward for sticking to my cautious training plan and hamstring rehab, and a good motivator to stay disciplined going forward.

After my run I spent some time reading and cleaning, and then escaped outside again to do some sketching…while intermittently hollering at the dog who kept trying to wander off of our little patio. In spite of the fur-baby supervising it was a lovely sketching session with the dead-head deer skull MM picked up a couple weeks ago. The skull’s geometry is intricate and challenging, and I had fun messing around with different views while trying to capture the layered combination of curves and ridges. 

I think this sketch session brings me back on track, at least until the next busy weekend!


After a hectic couple weeks I am grateful for this solitary day and for the time spent on quiet, renewing activities. 

I hope all of you were also able to spend the holiday in whatever way was needed, especially if honoring and remembering friends or loved ones.